Simple Parenting

This One Surprising Thing Can Boost Your Baby’s Language Development

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Did you know that babies begin developing the ability to speak and understand language BEFORE BIRTH?!?? I just learned there’s one HUGE way to boost language skills in babies and it might surprise you…

It’s music! Studies have shown that babies who make and move to music start to express themselves and communicate earlier than those who don’t.

In fact, exposure to music actually boosts kids’ brain activity—which scientists believe helps kids pick out patterns in complex sounds, which helps with speech skills!

But music has other benefits for language development too. Singing and rocking with a baby introduces rhythm and promotes early literacy skills. Exploring with musical play encourages sound formation, listening skills and introduces new words.

But let’s say you already have music on all day. Do you know why all those silly kids’ songs with hand movements are so important?

Well, when you’re singing “Wheels On The Bus” and showing how the wipers go “swish, swish, swish,” you’re encouraging language skills because babies can control their hands and do motions before they can speak words.

But no worries, grown-up music is okay, too. You can also try playing your own favorite songs, singing and moving along with your baby.

Of course just narrating your day and chatting with your baby gives them a huge boost too, but honestly, talking to your baby all day can be exhausting, right?!? So, when you’re all talked out and have read Goodnight Moon 672 times, turn on some good tunes and groove! 🎶


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Robyn is Editor-in-Chief at ParentsTogether and is co-author of several NYTimes bestselling anthologies. She lives in southern Michigan with her husband and five children.